Author Archives: Dave Poulson

Knight Center grad awarded environmental fellowship

Carol Thompson

Knight Center graduate Carol Thompson is among 13 journalists named to the inaugural class of the National Science-Health-Environment Reporting Fellowships.

Thompson, who graduated from the Michigan State University School of Journalism in 2012, developed her interest in environment reporting while reporting for the Knight Center’s Great Lakes Echo environmental news service.

“I still read it,” said Thompson, now a reporter at the Lansing (Michigan) State Journal.

Journalists selected for the award participate in workshops, a reporting bootcamp at the University of Missouri, multi-day field trips and webinars. They will attend national professional conferences for journalists reporting on health care, environment and science.

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Paid public radio internship for MSU students or recent MSU grads

The Knight Center for Environmental Journalism is underwriting another paid fulltime internship at Interlochen Public Radio for an MSU student or recent MSU graduate.
This is a great opportunity for someone interested in public radio or environmental issues.
One of the station’s reporters is an MSU J-School alum who once had this internship.
It runs at least 15 weeks, ideally beginning in September, with some flexibility on timing. The deadline to apply is April 23, 2021.

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Frank Kelley’s lasting impact on Michigan – and on me

Then Michigan Attorney General Frank Kelley, left, and David Poulson, in 1982. Image: Jerry Morton

By DAVID POULSON

LANSING — Almost 39 years ago, Attorney General Frank Kelley visited my journalism class at Michigan State University to explain government access laws.

Kelley often dropped by news organizations to give tutorials on the Open Meetings and Freedom of Information acts. Such visits garnered the favorable local news coverage he coveted.

Me? I wasn’t looking for a softball story when he extended his visits to students. I planned to use my rare shot at meeting a high state official to hit him hard about something big and controversial.

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