Tag Archives: SEJ2024

Unearthing climate change challenges along Delaware Bayshore

By Christa Young

Editor’s note: This is one in a series of stories coming out of a recent meeting of the Society of Environmental Journalists in Philadelphia.

Shane Godshall speaks to a group of journalists about his work doing habitat restoration on Money Island. Image: Christa Young

New Jersey’s Delaware Bayshore isn’t called the road less traveled without reason.

Persistent rainfall, exacerbated by global warming, has increased the wetlands in this area of Cumberland County.

Journalists, scientists, and conservationists are uncovering data showing that remote rural communities like Money Island will be flooded soon if politicians and state officials don’t act fast.

Roughly three dozen attendees of the recent Society of Environmental Journalists annual conference in Philadelphia traveled to Money Island, the smallest and most remote rural hamlet in the county. It was the first stop on a daylong traverse of a 70-mile stretch of untouched Delaware Bayshore coastline in southeast New Jersey.

Continue reading

Reporting on local food systems

By Vladislava Sukhanovskaya

Editor’s note: This is one in a series of stories coming out of a recent meeting of the Society of Environmental Journalists in Philadelphia.

Reporting on local food systems
Find someone who “is doing a spark” and who is recommended by dozens and dozens of other people. What else can you do to cover local food community ethically?

“Place both feet on the ground and take a moment to breathe,” said Malaika Hart Gilpin, executive director of One Art Community Center. “Give ourselves a moment to feel a connection with Mama Earth.”

Chairs and floor slightly vibrate in response. After a short meditation, the reporters attending a recent Society of Environmental Journalists conference in Philadelphia open their eyes. They are ready to listen about how to cover food systems.

Continue reading

Journalists hike urban wilderness of Wissahickon Valley Park

By Shealyn Paulis

Editor’s note: This is one in a series of stories coming out of a recent meeting of the Society of Environmental Journalists in Philadelphia.

Ruffian Tittman of Friends of Wissahickon explains that the journalists touring Wissahickon Valley Park have arrived on opening day of trout season. Image: Shealyn Paulis

Nestled in the heart of an urban and busy city, Wissahickon Valley Park of Philadelphia provides a place for city dwellers to enjoy the sanctuary of nature.

A popular spot for outdoor enthusiasts, historians and even wedding-goers, the park houses over 50 miles of trails and encompasses over 2,000 protected acres along a stretch of the Wissahickon Creek as it passes through northwest Philadelphia.

Some Society of Environmental Journalists members had the opportunity to explore the greenery during their recent annual conference. Continue reading

Rethinking environmental journalism education

By Shealyn Paulis

Editor’s note: This is one in a series of stories coming out of a recent meeting of the Society of Environmental Journalists in Philadelphia.

Experts at the recent Society of Environmental Journalists conference in Philadelphia discussed environmental journalism education. Panelists included (left to right) moderator Bernardo Motta, assistant professor of journalism at Roger Williams University; Karen Coates, fellowship editor of Mongabay; Karla Mendes, fellow at (Brazil-based) Mongabay and equity and inclusion chair for the Society of Environmental Journalists Board of Directors; and Lisa Palmer, research professor of science communication at George Washington University. Attending virtually were panelists Laura Moorhead (top left of screen) and Andrea Wenzel (bottom). Image: Shealyn Paulis

 

Environmental journalists and educators face a changing media field and systemic barriers that make it difficult to improve the profession.

Experts at a recent Society of Environmental Journalists conference in Philadelphia addressed some of these challenges to reimagine a more sustainable system.

The panel, moderated by Bernardo Motta, the assistant professor of journalism at Roger Williams University, consisted of journalists and educators: Karen Coates, fellowship editor of Mongabay and Karla Mendes, a fellow at Mongabay and the equity and inclusion chair for the Society of Environmental Journalists Board of Directors and Lisa Palmer, research professor of science communication at George Washington University. Joining the conversation virtually were Laura Moorhead, associate professor of journalism at San Francisco State University and Andrea Wenzel, an associate professor at Temple University.

Continue reading