Category Archives: Students

 
Journalism and non-journalism students at Michigan State University explore how to better report environmental issues to the public at the Knight Center for Environmental Journalism.
 

Environmental journalism courses can help students meet the School of Journalism’s elective requirements. They can also be used as part of an environmental theme to complete the school’s concentration requirement by combining them with environment-related courses outside the journalism program. See your academic adviser or contact the Knight Center.
 
Non-journalism students interested in environmental issues are encouraged to contact instructors to discuss waiver of pre-requisites. Often a journalism environmental course may meet communication course requirements of other departments.
 

 
Undergraduates are also encouraged to join the student Environmental Journalism Association and write for Great Lakes Echo to gain resume-building experience and clips.
 
Undergraduate students are eligible for several awards and scholarships in environmental journalism.
 
They are encouraged to augment their study with environment classes and programs elsewhere at MSU such as the Residential Initiative on the Study of the Environment.
 
 

Pollution in Lurin river  

The Knight Center for Environmental Journalism recently taught an online environmental journalism to a group of university students in Peru. This is one of the stories produced during that effort. The program was funded by the U.S. Embassy in Lima.

By Gonzalo Bedoya  

For thousands of years, the Lurin River has been used by our ancestors.  

However, they lived in harmony with nature, developed agricultural activities and did not invade the spaces that corresponded to the river itself or its slopes.  

Time has passed and, far from improving, the situation has drastically worsened. Today the Lurin River is drastically polluted, and the cause of this problem is the presence of invaders.  Continue reading

Dismissed Relics: Real Felipe Fortress  

The Knight Center for Environmental Journalism recently taught an online environmental journalism to a group of university students in Peru. This is one of the stories produced during that effort. The program was funded by the U.S. Embassy in Lima.

By Micaela Sotillo  

Peru is a country with monuments of great historical value, and for every street or avenue you walk, there will be something to tell about it.  

The huacas, temples and fortresses are located inside and outside the cities, giving an effect of mysticism to the neighborhoods. 

In the Callao region, known for being the largest seaport since the viceroyalty, there is the Real Felipe Fortress. It is the most fascinating attraction of the port of Callao.  

Built in the 18th century, the Real Felipe defended Lima from pirate attacks, and the strong walls continued to protect the city even after independence in the 19th century. 

This wonderful monument is the pride of many citizens of the region. 

However, a few weeks ago, many citizens registered complaints about the poor condition and maintenance outside the installations. Between plastic bags and organic waste, the foundations are deteriorating, and what seemed like a place admired by many is now a concern for history lovers.  Continue reading

Piles of garbage clutter Villa El Salvador  

The Knight Center for Environmental Journalism recently taught an online environmental journalism to a group of university students in Peru. This is one of the stories produced during that effort. The program was funded by the U.S. Embassy in Lima.

By Valeria Romero Espinoza  

The corners of streets and avenues in the district of Villa El Salvador have become a garbage dump that creates an unpleasant landscape for passers-by who pass through these places daily.  

The piles of garbage are an ongoing problem because the system for the collection and transportation of domestic and public waste is deficient and disorganized. 

There is no proper solid waste management by the local government.  

People leave their garbage bags and all types of waste at certain points on public roads, such as sidewalks, parks, avenues and central berms, many of these around markets, hospitals and schools, which leads to the accumulation of large amounts of garbage.  

Garbage bags on Av. Micaela Bastidas.

Neighbors say this problem has several roots.   Continue reading

Journalism students study cross-border environmental problems in Port Huron

Environmental reporting students on the beach at Lakeport State Park

Students in Knight Center director Eric Freedman’s Environmental Reporting class spent a day in Port Huron, Michigan, to explore transborder U.S.-Canadian environmental problems, including the continuing cleanup of a toxic hot spot and the threat of invasive species.

Such problems – along with extreme weather events, air and water pollution, climate warming, wildfires and the like – pay no attention to national borders or political jurisdictions.

The St. Clair River separates Port Huron from Sarnia, Ontario. Both cities are on Lake Huron.

Learning about native plants along the Blue Water River Walk

The recent field visit, supported by a grant from MSU’s Canadian Studies Center, began with a 1-mile hike along the Blue Water River Walk led by Shari Faust and Lynnea McFadden of the Friends of the St. Clair River.

Running for about 40 miles, the river connects Lake Huron with Lake St. Clair. Continue reading